How the West was Won

I enjoyed a relaxing Sunday earlier this week and discovered one of my old favorite movies was on. How the West was Won. While Deborah Reynolds and Gregory Peck carried much of the story one of my three heroes was there, John Wayne. My Father and Joshua Chamberlin are the other two. This day in 1861the American Civil War began when Confederates fire on Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor. The fort had been the source of tension between the Union and Confederacy for several months. After South Carolina seceded, the state demanded the fort be turned over, but Union officials refused. A supply ship, the “Star of the West,” tried to reach Fort Sumter on January 9, but the shore batteries opened fire and drove it away. For both sides, Sumter was a symbol of sovereignty.

Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Your Blood His Guts

My Dad was a WWII veteran. While he served under Gen. Mark Clark he told me General Patton’s nickname became “. He told the joke among the mean was that it was His Guts your Blood. “Blood and Guts” Patton on this day in 1945 and his 3rd Army captured Frankfurt, as “Old Blood and Guts” continued his march east. Frankfurt am Main, literally “On the Main” River, in western Germany, was the mid-19th century capital of.

Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The Passing of a Great Legionnaire

Before I begin my article, I want to take time to share the passing of a wonderful man, veteran, and citizen of Hominy. WWII Navy vet John Fields passed last week, and it was difficult time for all of us who attend the Monday morning breakfasts and general meetings. His funeral was last Saturday, and he is laid to rest at the Hominy cemetery. We had nine Legion members who attended the funeral. He will be sorely missed. Salute John, greet Rex, Dick and the rest and keep the Joe warm at the campfires. We all follow the final orders f our Supreme Commander to the final bivouac.

There was exciting news. The City Council has passed the resolution for Hominy to be recognized by the Purple Heart Society. Our Commander talked with John Henry Mashunkashey with the Purple Heart Society; he said things will move forward to establish signs at the entrances of our city as a Purple Heart city. Those who bore wounds of war or died due to them in service to their country are honored.

Okay Sherry and Babo with respect and a salute. I have lived in and loved Texas, our southernmost brethren have a history of independence and fierce patriotism not exceeded by any other. For a Sooner like me, that only day is the Red River Rivalry. However, a Texan transplant stood strong in Vietnam this day in 1967. I want to honor him.

David McHerney was a hero and performed amazing acts of heroism. Let me tell you the details. He was a First Sergeant, U.S. Army, Company A, 1st Battalion, 8th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. He fought in Polei Doc, Republic of Vietnam on 22 March 1967. He first entered service at Fort Bliss, Tex. Born a Yankee n Massachusetts he was assigned to Texas. Texas, like so many other states, embrace those that come from the outside. 1st Sgt. McNerney distinguished himself when his unit was attacked by a North Vietnamese battalion near Polei Doc.

Running through the hail of enemy fire to the area of heaviest contact, he was assisting in the development of a defensive perimeter when he encountered several enemy at close range. He killed the enemy but was painfully injured when blown from his feet by a grenade. In spite of this injury, he assaulted and destroyed an enemy machinegun position that had pinned down 5 of his comrades beyond the defensive line.

Upon learning his commander and artillery forward observer had been killed, he assumed command of the company. He adjusted artillery fire to within 20 meters of the position in a daring measure to repulse enemy assaults. When the smoke grenades used to mark the position were gone, he moved into a nearby clearing to designate the location to friendly aircraft. In spite of enemy fire, he remained exposed until he was certain the position was spotted and then climbed into a tree and tied the identification panel to its highest branches.

Then he moved among his men readjusting their position, encouraging the defenders and checking the wounded. As the hostile assaults slackened, he began clearing a helicopter landing site to evacuate the wounded. When explosives were needed to remove large trees, he crawled outside the relative safety of his perimeter to collect demolition material from abandoned rucksacks. Moving through a fusillade of fire he returned with the explosives that were vital to the clearing of the landing zone. He disregarded the pain of his injury and refused medical evacuation. He remained with his unit until the next day when the new commander arrived. First Sgt. McNerney’s outstanding heroism and leadership were inspirational to his comrades. His actions resulted in the award of Medal of Honor.

On the here and now local, we continue to have two efforts to raise funds that come back to the community. The Department of Oklahoma in OKC has Legion 100th Anniversary coins for sale at $15 each. We also have another 10-gun raffle going on at Post 142, for only $10 you can get one of 10 different guns being raffled off. Last week I listed a Henry 17 HMR Rifle. A Thompson 50 Caliber Bone Collector. The Mossberg 935 Turkey Shotgun. Also, the Ruger AR 556. Here are the rest up for grabs. SIG Model 1911 “We the people” handgun. A Weatherbly PA-08 12 Gauge. Add to that a Henry lever action 22 rifle, a Ruger 380ACPhandgun with laser, Henry .45 Big Boy, and a Thompson .50 Cal Muzzleloader. You know a Legionnaire? Ask them to get you in the raffle!

Next Legion Meeting will be Thursday April 5th, usually with inner at 6:00 PM and meeting at 7:00 PM. If there is a change I will get the word out. Monday morning Koffee Klatch meetings in March are still scheduled for biscuits and gravy with always a cup of Joe (coffee to the civilians). Keep your eye on the weather in case things must be postponed (like freezing weather). If you are a veteran come on by. If you have a good story it may end up in print. Also keep up with us at website “americanlegion142.org”.

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Old Soldiers Never Die

First, today in 1919 the American Legion was founded in Paris by 1,000 veterans of the American Expeditionary Force who met to discuss transition to civilian life and what veterans could do to help each other adjust and to work together to further the rights of veterans.

Now in the near past in 2010 the passing of the United States generation that fought in World War I was marked by the funeral of Frank Buckles, who died on 27 February 2011, aged 110. He was buried with full military honors at Arlington National Cemetery. Frank Woodruff Buckles (born Wood Buckles, February 1, 1901 – February 27, 2011) was a United States Army soldier and the last surviving American veteran of World War I. He enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1917 and served with a detachment from Fort Riley, driving ambulances and motorcycles near the front lines in Europe. During World War II, he was captured by Japanese forces while working in the shipping business and spent three years in the Philippines as a civilian prisoner.

After the war, Buckles married in San Francisco and moved to Gap View Farm near Charles Town, West Virginia. A widower at age 98, he worked on his farm until the age of 105. In his last years, he was Honorary Chairman of the World War I Memorial Foundation. As chairman, he advocated the establishment of a World War I memorial similar to other war memorials in Washington, D.C. Toward this end Buckles campaigned for the District of Columbia War Memorial to be renamed the National World War I Memorial. He testified before Congress in support of this cause and met with President George W. Bush at the White House. Buckles was awarded the World War I Victory Medal at the conclusion of that conflict, and the Army of Occupation of Germany Medal retroactively following the medal’s creation in 1941, as well as the French Legion of Honor in 1999.What a day this was in the past. But now to the future.

We have two efforts to raise funds that come back to the community. The Department of Oklahoma in OKC has Legion 100th Anniversary coins for sale at $15 each. We also have another 10-gun raffle going on at Post 142, for only $10 you can get one of 10 different guns being raffled off. Want a Henry 17 HMR Rifle? Or a Thompson 50 Caliber Bone Collector. How about a Mossberg 935 Turkey Shotgun? There is a Ruger AR 556. There are a few more I will share next week. You know a Legionnaire? Ask them to get you in the raffle!

Next Legion Meeting will be Thursday March 15th at 7:00 PM. Monday morning Koffee Klatch meetings in March are still scheduled for biscuits and gravy with always a cup of Joe (coffee to the civilians). Keep your eye on the weather in case things must be postponed (like freezing weather). If you are a veteran come on by. If you have a good story it may end up in print. Also keep up with us at website “americanlegion142.org”.

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Recognition Deserved

This day in 1918 President Wilson authorized the Army’s Distinguished Service Medal. The Distinguished Service Medal is awarded to any person who while serving in any capacity with the U.S. Army, that had distinguished himself or herself by exceptionally meritorious service to the Government in a duty of great responsibility.

Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment