The Beginnings of the USAF-The Berlin Airlift

An important event occurred since my last article in history. It’s social-economic and geopolitical impact still is felt today even though the Berlin Wall came down long ago. Writings this reminds me of a few books my buddy and WWII veteran Dick Pope loaned me a while back about the Berlin Airlift. Fascinating reading. As the Post Historian I would like to share.

Last week on September 30th but in 1949 fifteen months and more than 250,000 flights, the Berlin Airlift officially came to an end. The airlift was one of the greatest logistical feats in modern history and was one of the crucial events of the early Cold War. In June 1948, the Soviet Union suddenly blocked all ground traffic into West Berlin, which was located entirely within the Russian zone of occupation in Germany. It was an obvious effort to force the United States, Great Britain, and France (the other occupying powers in Germany) to accept Soviet demands concerning the postwar fate of Germany. As a result of the Soviet blockade, the people of West Berlin were left without food, clothing, or medical supplies. Some U.S. officials pushed for an aggressive response to the Soviet provocation, but cooler heads prevailed and a plan for an airlift of supplies to West Berlin was developed.

It was a daunting task: supplying the daily wants and needs of so many civilians would require tons of food and other goods each and every day. On June 26, 1948, the Berlin Airlift began with U.S. pilots and planes carrying the lion’s share of the burden. During the next 15 months, 277,264 aircraft landed in West Berlin bringing over 2 million tons of supplies. On September 30, 1949, the last plane–an American C-54–landed in Berlin and unloaded over two tons of coal. Even though the Soviet blockade officially ended in May 1949, it took several more months for the West Berlin economy to recover and the necessary stockpiles of food, medicine, and fuel to be replenished.

The Berlin Airlift was a tremendous Cold War victory for the United States. Without firing a shot, the Americans foiled the Soviet plan to hold West Berlin hostage, while simultaneously demonstrating to the world the “Yankee ingenuity” for which their nation was famous. For the Soviets, the Berlin crisis was an unmitigated disaster. The United States, France, and Great Britain merely hardened their resolve on issues related to Germany, and the world came to see the Russians as international bullies, trying to starve innocent citizens.

Tonight we feast at our October 6th meeting highlighting Chef Sebert’s offering of Beans and Cornbread (1800 hrs). Are you a veteran? Come on by and see what is going on!

Our regular meetings are the 1st and 3rd Thursday of the month. (Next one is the 20th). The Monday morning Koffee Klatch meetings for September Monday’s are still scheduled for biscuits and gravy and always a cup of Joe (coffee to the civilians).  Keep your eye on the weather in case things have to be postponed. If you are a veteran come on by. If you have a good story it may end up in print. Also keep up with us at website “americanlegion142.org”.

About Gary Lanham

Authors the weekly article "News from the Hut", about local American Legion Post #142 in Hominy, OK. Read his weekly articles in the "Hominy News Progress".
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