Liberty!

Hats off to our American Legion Post 142 veteran’s. They consistiently put flags up and down to remind the citizen’s of Hominy of our patriotic roots during meaningful occasions. They do it without recognition, without compensation. They do it because they understand sacrifice and liberty. I read on face book where folks in our town complain about things they have little understanding of but they miss the smaller, greater things. They have the liberty to complain without fear of reprisal or suppression. I say this on a very important day in our history.

Today in 1885 The Statue of Liberty, a gift of friendship from the people of France to the people of the United States, arrived in New York City’s harbor. Originally known as “Liberty Enlightening the World,” the statue was proposed by French historian Edouard Laboulaye to commemorate the Franco-American alliance during the American Revolution. Designed by French sculptor Frederic Auguste Bartholdi, the 151-foot statue was the form of a woman with an uplifted arm holding a torch. In February 1877, Congress approved the use of a site on New York Bedloe’s Island, which was suggested by Bartholdi. In May 1884, the statue was completed in France, and three months later the Americans laid the cornerstone for its pedestal in New York.

On June 19, 1885, the dismantled Statue of Liberty arrived in the New World, enclosed in more than 200 packing cases. Its copper sheets were reassembled, and the last rivet of the monument was fitted on October 28, 1886, during a dedication presided over by U.S. President Grover Cleveland. On the pedestal was inscribed “The New Colossus,” a famous sonnet by American poet Emma Lazarus that welcomed immigrants to the United States with the declaration, “Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me. I lift my lamp beside the golden door.” Six years later, Ellis Island, adjacent to Bedloe’s Island, opened as the chief entry station for immigrants to the United States, and for the next 32 years more than 12 million immigrants were welcomed into New York harbor by the sight of “Lady Liberty.” In 1924, the Statue of Liberty was made a national monument. On a personal note my bucket list had this site visit on it. I have only seen it from a flight out of LaGuardia Airport, one day I hope to stand at it’s base.

Don’t forget we have tickets for sale. For only $10.00 [$5.00 goes to the Post] you could win $2,019.00 in cash at the drawing at State Convention in July! The first, second, and third place tickets will win $2,019.00! The next seven winners will get smaller amounts. We also have 100th anniversary American Legion “Challenge’ Coins for $10. They are one of a kind and a collectable item. I got mine, bought a few to present to a few special veteran friends as well.

Regular Legion meetings are usually the first and third Thursday of the month but this month it will be this week, June 20th . Koffee Klatch meetings in June are still scheduled for biscuits and gravy and always a cup of Joe (coffee to the civilians). Just watch the weather, it is the only factor that my change that. I think the Chef is on duty as we are into the spring. If you are a veteran come on by. If you have a good story it may end up in print. Also keep up with us at website “americanlegion142.org”.

About Gary Lanham

Authors the weekly article "News from the Hut", about local American Legion Post #142 in Hominy, OK. Read his weekly articles in the "Hominy News Progress".
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